j0ni: (bugs all over me)
Now Rachel is reading the damn thing. She's a fast reader, and every 5 or 10 minutes she's reporting the death of another character. I have requested a summary at the end rather than the running totals.
j0ni: (bugs all over me)
Now Rachel is reading the damn thing. She's a fast reader, and every 5 or 10 minutes she's reporting the death of another character. I have requested a summary at the end rather than the running totals.
j0ni: (Default)
Hahahah Rachel just got back from Save On Foods -- they apparently have hundreds of copies of the new Harry Potter book all piled up on a special table at the end of the book aisle. You can get $8 off if you have a bunch of loyalty points! And no-one has been buying them at all this morning!

Sometimes the Nanaimoness of Nanaimo pleases me.
j0ni: (Default)
Hahahah Rachel just got back from Save On Foods -- they apparently have hundreds of copies of the new Harry Potter book all piled up on a special table at the end of the book aisle. You can get $8 off if you have a bunch of loyalty points! And no-one has been buying them at all this morning!

Sometimes the Nanaimoness of Nanaimo pleases me.
j0ni: (Default)
Anyone done any Erlang programming?

I like the idea of stateless concurrency. It seems like it's acknowledging the inherent problems of state management and codependency in software -- problems which are widely understood and acknowledged in network programming (except in Java RMI!), but which are usually considered to be irrelevant on a single machine.

NB I realize that RMI has RemoteExceptions but years ago when it was new, people argued and argued about how RemoteExceptions broke the RMI abstraction. My opinion is yes, they do, but that's because the abstraction is inappropriate. The fact that there was an argument about it at all demonstrates that most code monkeys can't be trusted to see beyond the abstraction.
j0ni: (Default)
Anyone done any Erlang programming?

I like the idea of stateless concurrency. It seems like it's acknowledging the inherent problems of state management and codependency in software -- problems which are widely understood and acknowledged in network programming (except in Java RMI!), but which are usually considered to be irrelevant on a single machine.

NB I realize that RMI has RemoteExceptions but years ago when it was new, people argued and argued about how RemoteExceptions broke the RMI abstraction. My opinion is yes, they do, but that's because the abstraction is inappropriate. The fact that there was an argument about it at all demonstrates that most code monkeys can't be trusted to see beyond the abstraction.

Chainsaw

3/7/07 10:21
j0ni: (Default)

Chainsaw
Originally uploaded by Kwai Chang Caine
WHAT

[livejournal.com profile] midendian: why was there a chainsaw just sitting under the peir?
[livejournal.com profile] j0ni: it was under a lamp-post, and i have no idea
[livejournal.com profile] midendian: if that were america, they'd shut the whole city down for days until they found out what terrorist had put it there
[livejournal.com profile] midendian: or am i thinking of britain?
[livejournal.com profile] j0ni: heheh america
[livejournal.com profile] j0ni: in the UK they'd just ban lampposts
[livejournal.com profile] midendian: or surround the lamppost by a dozen security camers
[livejournal.com profile] j0ni: ah see they already did, so they'd probably just call the CIA and organize a nice flight out of prestwick for the culprit
[livejournal.com profile] midendian: good point

Tags:

Chainsaw

3/7/07 10:21
j0ni: (Default)

Chainsaw
Originally uploaded by Kwai Chang Caine
WHAT

[livejournal.com profile] midendian: why was there a chainsaw just sitting under the peir?
[livejournal.com profile] j0ni: it was under a lamp-post, and i have no idea
[livejournal.com profile] midendian: if that were america, they'd shut the whole city down for days until they found out what terrorist had put it there
[livejournal.com profile] midendian: or am i thinking of britain?
[livejournal.com profile] j0ni: heheh america
[livejournal.com profile] j0ni: in the UK they'd just ban lampposts
[livejournal.com profile] midendian: or surround the lamppost by a dozen security camers
[livejournal.com profile] j0ni: ah see they already did, so they'd probably just call the CIA and organize a nice flight out of prestwick for the culprit
[livejournal.com profile] midendian: good point

Tags:
j0ni: (alien)
So how annoying is the del.icio.us link dropping? Is it polluting your friends page? It obviously happens far more often than I post, but I hadn't really considered until checking my actual recent entries page today that it might be annoying.

I like the idea of it, but I can see how the execution might irritate. Speak freely.
j0ni: (alien)
So how annoying is the del.icio.us link dropping? Is it polluting your friends page? It obviously happens far more often than I post, but I hadn't really considered until checking my actual recent entries page today that it might be annoying.

I like the idea of it, but I can see how the execution might irritate. Speak freely.
j0ni: (Default)
In Charlie Stross' novel 'Accelerando', the first AI consists of a very confused bunch of uploaded Lobsters. It seems the first upload is actually going to be a mouse.

Mouse brain simulated on computer

US researchers have simulated half a virtual mouse brain on a supercomputer.

The scientists ran a "cortical simulator" that was as big and as complex as half of a mouse brain on the BlueGene L supercomputer.
~
The three researchers, James Frye, Rajagopal Ananthanarayanan, and Dharmendra S. Modha, laid out how they went about it in a very short research note entitled "Towards Real-Time, Mouse-Scale Cortical Simulations". Half a real mouse brain is thought to have about eight million neurons each one of which can have up to 8,000 synapses, or connections, with other nerve fibres.
~
The vast complexity of the simulation meant that it was only run for ten seconds at a speed ten times slower than real life - the equivalent of one second in a real mouse brain

That's from the BBC News site, and there's more here, and it looks like it was part of the project described in this New Scientist article, back in 2005. Not surprisingly, it's being widely reported as a portend of a strange future, and of course it was on boingboing yesterday.

Many people are pointing out that this really isn't a mouse brain simulation, since the simulated neurons lack any brainlike structure, and that it's better described as a platform upon which a mouse brain might be simulated. Which is of course fair comment; we're approaching the minimum computronium density necessary for the uploading of consciousness to be feasible. That's pretty cool.
j0ni: (Default)
In Charlie Stross' novel 'Accelerando', the first AI consists of a very confused bunch of uploaded Lobsters. It seems the first upload is actually going to be a mouse.

Mouse brain simulated on computer

US researchers have simulated half a virtual mouse brain on a supercomputer.

The scientists ran a "cortical simulator" that was as big and as complex as half of a mouse brain on the BlueGene L supercomputer.
~
The three researchers, James Frye, Rajagopal Ananthanarayanan, and Dharmendra S. Modha, laid out how they went about it in a very short research note entitled "Towards Real-Time, Mouse-Scale Cortical Simulations". Half a real mouse brain is thought to have about eight million neurons each one of which can have up to 8,000 synapses, or connections, with other nerve fibres.
~
The vast complexity of the simulation meant that it was only run for ten seconds at a speed ten times slower than real life - the equivalent of one second in a real mouse brain

That's from the BBC News site, and there's more here, and it looks like it was part of the project described in this New Scientist article, back in 2005. Not surprisingly, it's being widely reported as a portend of a strange future, and of course it was on boingboing yesterday.

Many people are pointing out that this really isn't a mouse brain simulation, since the simulated neurons lack any brainlike structure, and that it's better described as a platform upon which a mouse brain might be simulated. Which is of course fair comment; we're approaching the minimum computronium density necessary for the uploading of consciousness to be feasible. That's pretty cool.
j0ni: (Default)
Watching the original release of bladerunner tv edition. In the future vid
phone #s in media LA also start with 555. Somehow reassuring.

Anyone know how to set friend-only (better still group access) by email
post?
j0ni: (Default)
Watching the original release of bladerunner tv edition. In the future vid
phone #s in media LA also start with 555. Somehow reassuring.

Anyone know how to set friend-only (better still group access) by email
post?

Eclipse

30/3/06 18:34
j0ni: (Default)
Rachel's dad took these pics of the eclipse the other day:





from their yard in Cyprus. As soon as she posted them, the hit count went mental - One has been checked out almost 2000 times... we're wondering where it's been blogged. An internet mystery.

Cool pics though.

Eclipse

30/3/06 18:34
j0ni: (Default)
Rachel's dad took these pics of the eclipse the other day:





from their yard in Cyprus. As soon as she posted them, the hit count went mental - One has been checked out almost 2000 times... we're wondering where it's been blogged. An internet mystery.

Cool pics though.
j0ni: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] sema4_v is always complaining about how hot my house is, and I would agree that it has a tendency to overheat when the sun is shining (which is why I moved my office to the back of the house). However, he just made the rather implausible claim that 15 degrees Celsius is actually a comfortable room temperature.

I cannot find any mention of room temperature on the Internet using my usual TSOR strategy which matches this rather rash claim. I see that some SID/cot death website suggests that 16-20 is optimal for avoiding, well, cot death (but SID science is ephemeral at best), but everyone else in the world seems to think a comfortable room temperature is between 20 and 25 degrees Celsius.

Please comment if your own preferences fall outside the 20 to 25 range. I need to put a stop to this incorrigible whining.
j0ni: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] sema4_v is always complaining about how hot my house is, and I would agree that it has a tendency to overheat when the sun is shining (which is why I moved my office to the back of the house). However, he just made the rather implausible claim that 15 degrees Celsius is actually a comfortable room temperature.

I cannot find any mention of room temperature on the Internet using my usual TSOR strategy which matches this rather rash claim. I see that some SID/cot death website suggests that 16-20 is optimal for avoiding, well, cot death (but SID science is ephemeral at best), but everyone else in the world seems to think a comfortable room temperature is between 20 and 25 degrees Celsius.

Please comment if your own preferences fall outside the 20 to 25 range. I need to put a stop to this incorrigible whining.