j0ni: (Default)
I'm making this journal "friends mostly". I, like many others, am not particularly keen on the idea of limiting access this way, but the fact is that I'm not posting much any more due to being concerned about who gets the content.

I wish to be able to mouth off, and say what's on my mind.

I'm not a friends Nazi - comment and I'll probably add you. I'd encourage some folks I think might be reading to get a free account and let me know. It is not my intention to exclude anyone, just free myself up to speak more openly about stuff that might cause me trouble in the future.

Whatever. I'll still be posting stuff publicly, just probably not much.
j0ni: (Default)
[Error: unknown template qotd]

History of Ideas. I use it all the time, getting ideas, thinking about things, remembering ideas from the past.

Seriously, no practical application. Like death, it helps keep things in perspective I suppose. But even my technology MSc is irrelevant for my job, so the idea that my BA might have some applicability is LOL-worthy.
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Many lulz were had by all.

Regarding bicycle pornography, I give you Brother Cycles.

Brother Cycles Reynolds Track Frame from Brother Cycles on Vimeo.



Here is a Tokyo Fixed Gear build of that delicious frame.

Brother Reynolds Build

drool )
j0ni: (Default)
Song of the summer.



Here is a link to the youtube page for when lj-toys is not responding, which seems to be often.
j0ni: (Default)
I was at RailsConf last week. It was surprisingly enjoyable - I say "surprisingly" because I've had a mixed experience with rubyists in the past.

When I was young, I often used to sit moodily in the corner at nightclubs getting drunk and nursing a burning hatred of all the hip and socially successful kids as they rocked their mascara and snakebite combos. Sometimes Ruby events evoke this horrific memory.

Not that I dislike Ruby itself. I mean, it isn't life changing like Scheme or anything, but it is interesting, and quirky, and playful, and at times beautiful. But those rubyists on their fixies in their skinny jeans, well, they make me want to stick my fingers down my throat so I can throw up my rice cake and reclaim my cheekbones.

RailsConf was pretty good though. Marco (a traveling companion) had been before - he told me it had "grown up". Well, so am I, so it stands to reason that we'd get along better now. There were some hipsters, yes, but there were tons of regular nerds too. I enjoyed that.

Here is Gary Vaynerchuk's keynote from the show. I'd never heard of him before, but this was very amusing and I liked his thinking.



Baltimore was also good, although I only saw the inner harbour and the light rail route to the airport. I would like to come back and see more of the place, now that Stringer Bell is gone and Marlo Stanfield has things under control.

IMG_1642
j0ni: (Default)
I was at RailsConf last week. It was surprisingly enjoyable - I say "surprisingly" because I've had a mixed experience with rubyists in the past.

When I was young, I often used to sit moodily in the corner at nightclubs getting drunk and nursing a burning hatred of all the hip and socially successful kids as they rocked their mascara and snakebite combos. Sometimes Ruby events evoke this horrific memory.

Not that I dislike Ruby itself. I mean, it isn't life changing like Scheme or anything, but it is interesting, and quirky, and playful, and at times beautiful. But those rubyists on their fixies in their skinny jeans, well, they make me want to stick my fingers down my throat so I can throw up my rice cake and reclaim my cheekbones.

RailsConf was pretty good though. Marco (a traveling companion) had been before - he told me it had "grown up". Well, so am I, so it stands to reason that we'd get along better now. There were some hipsters, yes, but there were tons of regular nerds too. I enjoyed that.

Here is Gary Vaynerchuk's keynote from the show. I'd never heard of him before, but this was very amusing and I liked his thinking.



Baltimore was also good, although I only saw the inner harbour and the light rail route to the airport. I would like to come back and see more of the place, now that Stringer Bell is gone and Marlo Stanfield has things under control.

IMG_1642
j0ni: (Default)
"Whence shall we expect the approach of danger; shall some trans-Atlantic giant step the Earth and crush us at a blow? Never! All the armies of Europe and Asia shall not by force take a drink from the Ohio or make a track on the Blue Ride. If destruction be our lot, we must, ourselves, be it's author and finisher. As nation of free men, we will live forever, or die by suicide."
— Abraham Lincoln

j0ni: (Default)
"Whence shall we expect the approach of danger; shall some trans-Atlantic giant step the Earth and crush us at a blow? Never! All the armies of Europe and Asia shall not by force take a drink from the Ohio or make a track on the Blue Ride. If destruction be our lot, we must, ourselves, be it's author and finisher. As nation of free men, we will live forever, or die by suicide."
— Abraham Lincoln

j0ni: (Default)
Found dead in Thai hotel room.

Sounds like his death might turn out to have been just as remarkable as his life. There seems to be some uncharacteristic sensitivity in the press in the glossing over of embarrassing details (for now), which is a bit annoying. Whatever, he gone now.

Farewell Grasshopper, you were legend.
Tags:
j0ni: (Default)
Found dead in Thai hotel room.

Sounds like his death might turn out to have been just as remarkable as his life. There seems to be some uncharacteristic sensitivity in the press in the glossing over of embarrassing details (for now), which is a bit annoying. Whatever, he gone now.

Farewell Grasshopper, you were legend.
Tags:
j0ni: (Default)
Via [Bad username or unknown identity: pgdf:]:



Quite lovely. There's an album coming on June 23 apparently, I'm looking forward to it.
Tags:
j0ni: (Default)
Via [Bad username or unknown identity: pgdf:]:



Quite lovely. There's an album coming on June 23 apparently, I'm looking forward to it.
Tags:

Pole

22/1/09 11:04
j0ni: (Default)

Pole
Originally uploaded by Kwai Chang Caine
This pole is on the corner of the street, a block from my street, across the road from the school my kids go to. Those are all staples, from fly posters across the ages (well, the ages of modern Toronto, which is to say, not really that many ages).

This image makes me happy. It doesn't quite encapsulate everything I love about living here, but it captures a big chunk of it. So many people want us to do stuff, see stuff, buy stuff, find stuff. Things happen here. Hustle Bustle.

You'd think I'd be looking forward to the jazz festival, but there's so much else to distract me in the meantime.

After living on the west coast for 8 years, the rather more terse and less easily cordial manner of the folks here was a little difficult to get used to. But I'm used to it now - I figure they haven't changed, and if anything, it should have gotten worse with the weather, so the fact that I'm not really aware of people looking cross or unapproachable must mean that my brain chemistry has changed.

Good times.

Pole

22/1/09 11:04
j0ni: (Default)

Pole
Originally uploaded by Kwai Chang Caine
This pole is on the corner of the street, a block from my street, across the road from the school my kids go to. Those are all staples, from fly posters across the ages (well, the ages of modern Toronto, which is to say, not really that many ages).

This image makes me happy. It doesn't quite encapsulate everything I love about living here, but it captures a big chunk of it. So many people want us to do stuff, see stuff, buy stuff, find stuff. Things happen here. Hustle Bustle.

You'd think I'd be looking forward to the jazz festival, but there's so much else to distract me in the meantime.

After living on the west coast for 8 years, the rather more terse and less easily cordial manner of the folks here was a little difficult to get used to. But I'm used to it now - I figure they haven't changed, and if anything, it should have gotten worse with the weather, so the fact that I'm not really aware of people looking cross or unapproachable must mean that my brain chemistry has changed.

Good times.
j0ni: (Default)
Hello LJ!

Where will you all be when LJ ends? It's a funny thing, I can't think of a site which would not cause at least most of you all to curl your lips in supercilious distaste (and rightly so). OTOH, it is difficult imagining a time when LJ seemed like the right answer... so who knows.

I have triangulation on most of you now. Perhaps its time to do a bit of profile surfing and address book maintenance.
j0ni: (Default)
Hello LJ!

Where will you all be when LJ ends? It's a funny thing, I can't think of a site which would not cause at least most of you all to curl your lips in supercilious distaste (and rightly so). OTOH, it is difficult imagining a time when LJ seemed like the right answer... so who knows.

I have triangulation on most of you now. Perhaps its time to do a bit of profile surfing and address book maintenance.

Podcasts

5/8/07 00:39
j0ni: (Default)
I've been a podcast addict for a couple of years now. I love the medium - the fact is that it's relatively cheap and easy to produce good quality audio now, and although this means that there's a ton of crud out there, it also means that shallow and snap editorial decisions taken by busy media professionals no longer have to deprive us of potentially excellent content.

There is a downside to narrowcasting which is particularly evident in podcasting, perhaps because it resembles and therefore contrasts easily with radio. It's now possible to control the media you consume to the degree that you're never exposed to opinions or ideas that challenge you in any way. And in fact, this is quite likely to happen, since you have limited time and such a vast choice of material - it's inevitable that you'd end up consuming only that which tastes the best.

Still, bland affirmations notwithstanding, I consume a lot of podcasts. I listen to them when I'm falling to sleep, and when I'm out walking (which is a couple of hours a day, minimum, currently). I take them traveling and to the gym. Here are some recommendations. This isn't a cross-section of what I listen to, just the ones that I think stand out.

Point Of Inquiry

I listen to a couple of skeptic podcasts, but this one is by far the best. It's "the premiere podcast of the Center for Inquiry" and interviews folks from all over the meta-science and skeptic world.

DJ Grothe is a superb interviewer. His research is meticulous and his questions are perfectly judged to extract the essence from a given interviewee. At times he likes the sound of his voice a bit too much, but I find it very easy to forgive him based on the quality of the job he does the rest of the time.

Decoder Ring Theatre

A theatre troupe in Toronto doing faux old-time radio. The scripts are awesome, the production values at least as good as the radio plays I grew up listening to on BBC Radio 4. They have a couple of regular series which they produce in 6 episode "seasons".

The most successful seems to be Red Panda Adventures, which follows a fictional Canadian war superhero and is at times hilarious.

My favourite though is Black Jack Justice, a superb emulation of old-skool detective stories a la Mickey Spillane. An amusing piece of trivia: they're all written by Gregg Taylor, but Black Jack Justice is always introduced as "Martin Bracknell's immortal detective". This is a reference to the very first show which was done on the stage, and was actually the story of a fictional radio show by the same name. Martin Bracknell was the fictional author of the show. Gregg Taylor mentions in a meta-cast that he sees an awful lot of traffic on the Decoder Ring website which comes from Google searches for Martin Bracknell.

Escape Pod

This is the podcast I'd take to my desert island. If I had to choose just one, this would be it. Escape Pod is a weekly science fiction short story podcast, but there's more to it than that. Not that that wouldn't be enough - not every story floats my boat, but the quality is generally very high. And the occasional film reviews from Jonathon Sullivan are at times hilarious (I think I've linked to this fabulous review of Eragon before).

The show is presented by Steve Eley ([livejournal.com profile] sfeley) who usually does a 5 minute intro to each episode. I think it was Steve's good humour and honesty that turned this podcast into a habit for me. Candid insights and pithy observations which are in tune with our sensibilities make it easy to think of Escape Pod as a family member. Steve's definitely sounding more like an "old pro" these days which is perhaps inevitable, but he's still good and I still love the show. And the title music alone, supplied by Daikaiju, is enough reason to listen to Escape Pod.

Here's a bunch of good ones.

Tags:

Podcasts

5/8/07 00:39
j0ni: (Default)
I've been a podcast addict for a couple of years now. I love the medium - the fact is that it's relatively cheap and easy to produce good quality audio now, and although this means that there's a ton of crud out there, it also means that shallow and snap editorial decisions taken by busy media professionals no longer have to deprive us of potentially excellent content.

There is a downside to narrowcasting which is particularly evident in podcasting, perhaps because it resembles and therefore contrasts easily with radio. It's now possible to control the media you consume to the degree that you're never exposed to opinions or ideas that challenge you in any way. And in fact, this is quite likely to happen, since you have limited time and such a vast choice of material - it's inevitable that you'd end up consuming only that which tastes the best.

Still, bland affirmations notwithstanding, I consume a lot of podcasts. I listen to them when I'm falling to sleep, and when I'm out walking (which is a couple of hours a day, minimum, currently). I take them traveling and to the gym. Here are some recommendations. This isn't a cross-section of what I listen to, just the ones that I think stand out.

Point Of Inquiry

I listen to a couple of skeptic podcasts, but this one is by far the best. It's "the premiere podcast of the Center for Inquiry" and interviews folks from all over the meta-science and skeptic world.

DJ Grothe is a superb interviewer. His research is meticulous and his questions are perfectly judged to extract the essence from a given interviewee. At times he likes the sound of his voice a bit too much, but I find it very easy to forgive him based on the quality of the job he does the rest of the time.

Decoder Ring Theatre

A theatre troupe in Toronto doing faux old-time radio. The scripts are awesome, the production values at least as good as the radio plays I grew up listening to on BBC Radio 4. They have a couple of regular series which they produce in 6 episode "seasons".

The most successful seems to be Red Panda Adventures, which follows a fictional Canadian war superhero and is at times hilarious.

My favourite though is Black Jack Justice, a superb emulation of old-skool detective stories a la Mickey Spillane. An amusing piece of trivia: they're all written by Gregg Taylor, but Black Jack Justice is always introduced as "Martin Bracknell's immortal detective". This is a reference to the very first show which was done on the stage, and was actually the story of a fictional radio show by the same name. Martin Bracknell was the fictional author of the show. Gregg Taylor mentions in a meta-cast that he sees an awful lot of traffic on the Decoder Ring website which comes from Google searches for Martin Bracknell.

Escape Pod

This is the podcast I'd take to my desert island. If I had to choose just one, this would be it. Escape Pod is a weekly science fiction short story podcast, but there's more to it than that. Not that that wouldn't be enough - not every story floats my boat, but the quality is generally very high. And the occasional film reviews from Jonathon Sullivan are at times hilarious (I think I've linked to this fabulous review of Eragon before).

The show is presented by Steve Eley ([livejournal.com profile] sfeley) who usually does a 5 minute intro to each episode. I think it was Steve's good humour and honesty that turned this podcast into a habit for me. Candid insights and pithy observations which are in tune with our sensibilities make it easy to think of Escape Pod as a family member. Steve's definitely sounding more like an "old pro" these days which is perhaps inevitable, but he's still good and I still love the show. And the title music alone, supplied by Daikaiju, is enough reason to listen to Escape Pod.

Here's a bunch of good ones.

Tags:

WoW

5/8/07 00:34
j0ni: (Default)

WoW
Originally uploaded by Kwai Chang Caine
I go walking up here at Westwood Lake. It's always reminded me of World of Warcraft, but then today it occurred to me that there's a possibility that Blizzard has programmers who are local to BC or at least Washington. It might not be a coincidence that WoW looks like this.

It's so beautiful, and most of the time I just don't notice.

WoW

5/8/07 00:34
j0ni: (Default)

WoW
Originally uploaded by Kwai Chang Caine
I go walking up here at Westwood Lake. It's always reminded me of World of Warcraft, but then today it occurred to me that there's a possibility that Blizzard has programmers who are local to BC or at least Washington. It might not be a coincidence that WoW looks like this.

It's so beautiful, and most of the time I just don't notice.